Being the Manager of Your Home

It sounds very formal and official to call yourself a Home Manager, but every home is managed somehow — intentionally or unintentionally, well or poorly.

According to Google, a manager is:

  1. a person responsible for controlling or administering all or part of a company or similar organization. (A family or household)
  2. a person who controls the activities, business dealings, and other aspects of the career of an entertainer, athlete, group of musicians, etc. (a family or household)

Synonyms include: executive, head of department, supervisor, principal, administrator, head, director, managing director, CEO, employer, superintendent, foreman, forewoman, overseer; proprietor; boss, chief, head honcho

This is a VERY important job!  As with any professional business or career, a good manager can succeed even with mediocre employees and a bad manager will often fail even with excellent employees.

Family Pic 6.2015

Being a Home Manager sounds like a large and overwhelming job…especially on top of everything else in your life.  However, systematizing and simplifying your job as Home Manager will make the rest of your life easier and more joyful!

Every family wants a clean and comfortable place to call home.  Most people want to eat (at least) three meals a day.  Everyone wants to have their schedules under control so they feel like they are leading their lives instead of running to catch up.

Cleaning Supplies

These lofty goals are actually not that hard to achieve!  The secret lies in working smarter not harder; in setting priorities so you can let go of perfection in all areas and settle for good enough where you can.

Laundry on Clothesline

Most Home Managers struggle in one or more of these five main areas:

  1. Food
  2. Cleaning (including the unending tasks of dishes and laundry)
  3. Schedules
  4. Finances
  5. Health

yummy salad

Thankfully there are concrete steps you can take, systems you can create and implement, to take control of your home!  This will provide you with more time and energy for the things you want to do.

Check out Simplified Home Management for links to posts to help you simplify your life.

Which of these areas causes you the most stress in the management of your home?

Developing a Daily Routine

My mission for this summer is to refresh myself and my family with meaningful experiences that grow our relationships with each other.

I hope you are making progress on developing a daily and weekly cleaning routine (and getting your kids involved).  Hopefully, you are also finding some things to get rid of in order to make your cleaning tasks easier!

IMG_20170501_143116_896

A pile of stuff to get rid of — less stuff = less cleaning!

Today, we’re going to talk about developing a daily routine.  Having a daily routine gives security and predictability to our days.  We like knowing what to expect as the day progresses.  A comfortable flow to the day is also relaxing, (if you keep it simple!)

Think about your family’s current daily routine.

What things do you want to keep for the summer?  What things do you want to change?  What things do you want to alter to better fir the relaxed atmosphere of summer?  Make a list of the things you want to or need to keep in your summer routine:

Example: breakfast, chore time, lunch, free time, quiet rest time, supper, snacks, bath time, reading together, etc.

IMG_20170302_092903_303

Free play time is a necessary part of our daily routine.

If you are a very scheduled and “type A” person, you will need to adjust your focus from a scheduled, time-oriented view of life to a routine-oriented mindset.  Think of your daily routine as a bunch of things done in a particular order, not necessarily at a particular time.  The only things I try to keep at fairly regular times each day are meals and snacks.

Here is an example of or daily routine:

  • 7:30 am breakfast
  • Chore time
  • Education time/free time/special activity
  • 10:00 am snack
  • 12:30am lunch
  • Reading together
  • Quiet rest time
  • Free time/special activity
  • 3:00pm snack
  • 6:00pm supper
  • Free time/special activity (usually at home)
  • Bath/shower
  • Reading together
  • Bedtime

You may need to come up with a couple of different daily routines.  If you work outside of the home, it may work best for you to plan daily routine for work days and for non-work days.  If your weekdays and weekends look very different, you may need to make a routine for weekdays and another for weekends.  Generally, one main daily routine can easily be adapted to fit the needs of another day.

You know your family and how much down-time your family needs.

This will determine what a special activity look like for your family and how often your family can handle these special activities.  For my family, we can handle no more than one special activity each day.  I also know that we can’t handle spending some time away from home each day of the week.  This determines how I choose and plan activities for my family.

As you think through the things you want to include in your daily routine, remember to plan time for the things that are important to you.  Do you want to keep your kids (or yourself) learning this summer?  Look for a fun class in your area or online, choose some books you want to read together or some science experiments you want to do. Do you have a morning routine for yourself?  Summer is a great time to try on — my morning routine is essential to getting me ready for the rest of my day!

I highly suggest limiting screen time activities and being very choosy about what you allow.  Set a timer and make it a “reward” for after necessary tasks (daily cleaning habits, reading or educational activities).  There will be plenty of time and opportunities to spend time in front of screens when the weather turns cold and nasty!

IMG_20170429_074132_445

This is what screen time looks like when the battery on the computer runs low. 🙂

What things are you making time for in your daily routine?

 

 

Preparing to Take a Vacation From Cleaning (Sort of!)

If you are going away from home for a week of vacation you can pretty much let daily chores and laundry slide.  But for an entire summer you can’t.  Bummer, I know!  However, you can minimize the chores you need to do for the entire summer!

IMG_20170427_114047_764

The first thing you need to determine is what cleaning necessities are for you and for your family.  What things need to get done each day or each week to keep you home clean enough for you to happily function day in and day out.

Note: If you do not have any idea where to start with this and/or you have no chores that regularly get done each day/week and you feel as if your home is always a disaster, check out the blog, podcast or book from A Slob Comes Clean.  She has great advice and help for those who have little to no daily cleaning habits and need more help in this area.

And one of her e-books is in the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle on sale through May 1, 2017!

Example: Make beds, bathroom cleaning, sweep/vacuum, laundry, dust, quick tidy, yard work or gardening, groceries/errands.

Next, time yourself doing each chore individually.  Only one chore at a time.  Only that specific chore.  Write down the chore and the time it takes.  Do this for each individual chore.  Do this for a couple of days (or a week if you are an over-acheiver).  Now, add up the time you spend each day in basic cleaning tasks.  I’ll bet the average for each day is about 30 minutes.

Example: I can quick clean our bathroom in 5 minutes.  Doing the dishes after a meal takes me 5-10 minutes.  Folding/putting away one load of laundry takes 5-7 minutes.  Vacuuming our main living areas takes 5-10 minutes.

Determine if there are any of these chores you can delegate to other family members.  Can your children help with the cleaning?  The laundry? The food prep or dishes?  I firmly believe that children, even young children, can and should help out around the house.  It can be a struggle to motivate and encourage excellence in these areas but an important step to train our children in life skills.  Begin training hen now to help this summer with the motivation that when summer come you all can have more time for fun and activities together!  Getting the whole family involved is preparing for a vacation summer will help them look forward to and appreciate the summer even more.

From now on practice doing these daily and weekly minimal cleaning chores.  They will soon become a habit for everyone involved and the time it takes to do each chore will probably lessen.  One reason it is easy to keep a vacation resort cabin clean is because it starts clean and maintenance cleaning is easy because there is little clutter to move around or put away in order to clean!

The Ultimate Homemaking Bundle has great resources to help you de-clutter your home and develop simple cleaning systems that work for YOU!

The thing about a system is that what works for me may not work for you and what works for me today may not work for me tomorrow.  That is why I love having lots of resources to reference.  I now that I will find something that works today and I know that I will be able to find something will work for later.    Check out the resources included in just the organizing and home section:

  • 14 Days to Opening Your Front Door to Guests by Dana White ($7.99)

  • 2017-2018 Yearly Personal Planner by Jolanthe Erb ($4.99)

  • Bullet Journaling for Book Lovers by Anne Bogel ($15.00)

  • Clean Mama’s Just One Page Kit by Becky Rapinchuk ($7.00)

  • Clutterfree with Kids: Change Your Thinking. Discover New Habits. Free Your Home. by Joshua Becker ($5.99)

  • Command Center 101: A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating a Command Center that WORKS for Your Family by Meredith LeRoy ($5.00)

  • Creating Success At Home: Your Guide to Redefining Home, Conquering Clutter, Taking Back Time, Boosting Your Energy and Overcoming Decorating Fears by Sharon Hines ($3.99)

  • Family Chore System & Planner by Mandi Ehman ($17.00)

  • Life Your Way Complete Printables Download Pack by Mandi Ehman ($7.00)

  • Minimize the Mess: A Mother’s Guide to Simplifying the Home by Rachel Kratz ($2.99)

  • Overwhelm to Order: The Ultimate Homemaking Binder by Rachel Norman ($9.99)

  • Revive 30-Day Challenge by Jessica Fisher ($27.00)

  • Speed Clean the Deep Clean: A Collection of Time-Saving Cleaning Tutorials and Tips for Busy Moms by Katelyn Fagan ($4.99)

  • Sweet Life Planner: Vanilla Edition by Laura Smith ($35.00)

  • The Mindset of Organization: Take Back Your Home One Phase at a Time by Lisa Woodruff ($8.99)

  • The Paperless Home: How to Use Evernote to Organize Your Life by Abby Lawson ($32.00)

  • The Ultimate Spring Cleaning Hack Guide by Amy Bellgardt ($9.99)

  • Your Intentional Holiday: Heart & Home Planner by Victoria Osborn ($10.00)

These resources alone are worth well over the cost of the bundle…And there are ELEVEN other sections as well as special bonuses!

Check out the Ultimate Homemaking Bundle  and order HERE!